Water

The Coquitlam Glacier, Metro Vancouver’s last remaining glacier, is disappearing fast. A Science study predicts some 80 per cent of B.C. glaciers will have disappeared by 2100. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Metro Vancouver

Disappearing glaciers in B.C. put tourism, watersheds at risk: scientist

Brian Menounos predicts most glaciers will disappear but warns against inaction

 

Creekside Estate Villas located in South Pandosy area. (Google)

Kelowna condo residents without hot water for 8 days, no help in sight

Homeowners were told parts may not be available to fix the issue for up to six weeks

 

Sockeye salmon struggle to get upstream in historically low water levels in Weaver Creek near the Harrison River north of Chilliwack on Oct. 20, 2022. (Submitted by a Watershed Watch Salmon Society volunteer)

OPINION w/VIDEO: Salmon die and people lose their water as B.C. sleepwalks into yet another crisis

‘It’s time those responsible for protecting B.C.s environment spent a little more time out here with us’

  • Oct 25, 2022

 

A view of Gibsons Landing from the top of Soames Hill, a short but steep hike on British Columbia’s Sunshine Coast, is seen near the town of Grantham’s Landing, B.C., on May 23, 2016. Some businesses and amenities on British Columbia’s Sunshine Coast must stop using all treated drinking water within hours as severe drought in the region forces declaration of a state of local emergency, but officials say there’s no need to panic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lauren Krugel

First COVID, now drought, B.C. brewery takes water-use restrictions in stride

Water system that supplies Sechelt area is at ‘imminent risk’ of running dry

A view of Gibsons Landing from the top of Soames Hill, a short but steep hike on British Columbia’s Sunshine Coast, is seen near the town of Grantham’s Landing, B.C., on May 23, 2016. Some businesses and amenities on British Columbia’s Sunshine Coast must stop using all treated drinking water within hours as severe drought in the region forces declaration of a state of local emergency, but officials say there’s no need to panic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lauren Krugel
A man walks in the water off Locarno Beach during a stretch of unseasonably warm weather, in Vancouver, B.C., Thursday, Oct. 6, 2022. Water use in Metro Vancouver is much higher, while reservoir levels are lower than normal, prompting the regional district to ask millions of residents and businesses to conserve.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Drought prompts request for Metro Vancouver residents to take shorter showers

Region’s water use up by 20 per cent for time of year because of the extended dry weather

A man walks in the water off Locarno Beach during a stretch of unseasonably warm weather, in Vancouver, B.C., Thursday, Oct. 6, 2022. Water use in Metro Vancouver is much higher, while reservoir levels are lower than normal, prompting the regional district to ask millions of residents and businesses to conserve.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Drowning is “not the violent splashing and shouting for help that one sees on TV. There’s no screaming or flailing of arms,” writes reporter Jenna Hauck. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress file)

COLUMN: Drowning is silent; familiarize yourself with the signs of it

Chilliwack reporter shares what signs of drowning look like after incident with son in pool

Drowning is “not the violent splashing and shouting for help that one sees on TV. There’s no screaming or flailing of arms,” writes reporter Jenna Hauck. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress file)
A man’s body was recovered from Long Lake after he was reported missing over the weekend. (Black Press Media file photo)

Man’s body recovered from Nanaimo lake after apparent drowning

Victim went for a swim Sunday, searchers found body Monday

A man’s body was recovered from Long Lake after he was reported missing over the weekend. (Black Press Media file photo)
Members of the Iqaluit Fire Department assist with flushing the city’s water pipes in Iqaluit, Nunavut, on Wednesday, Oct. 27, 2021. Engineers say the source of fuel in Iqaluit’s water likely comes from an underground fuel tank built in 1962. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Dustin Patar
Members of the Iqaluit Fire Department assist with flushing the city’s water pipes in Iqaluit, Nunavut, on Wednesday, Oct. 27, 2021. Engineers say the source of fuel in Iqaluit’s water likely comes from an underground fuel tank built in 1962. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Dustin Patar
Residents line up to fill containers with potable water in Iqaluit, Nunavut on Thursday, Oct. 14, 2021. The City of Iqaluit says an old underground spill is likely responsible for fuel that is contaminating the city’s tap water. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Emma Tranter

Underground fuel spill found next to Iqaluit’s water treatment plant

No timeline for when the city’s residents will be able to drink Iqaluit’s tap water again

Residents line up to fill containers with potable water in Iqaluit, Nunavut on Thursday, Oct. 14, 2021. The City of Iqaluit says an old underground spill is likely responsible for fuel that is contaminating the city’s tap water. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Emma Tranter