‘Over service’ issue for hotel to address

The Vines Lounge manager states that the reason Susan was refused further alcoholic service was because she had been “over-served."

To the editor:

Regarding Homophobia Complaint Arises At Hotel, Jan. 24, Capital News.

The Vines Lounge manager states that the reason Susan was refused further alcoholic service was because she had been “over-served and was becoming over gregarious,’’ and that it had nothing to do with her kissing her girlfriend.

Daniel Bibby, the Delta Grand Hotel general manager, claims that by his estimates, “Hillock was drunk” and then in the same breath states that the hotel was “being compliant with B.C. liquor laws,” and that he has “a great team of service staff who are well trained, and refuse additional drinks to people they believe are intoxicated.”

If you have the great staff you claim you do, Mr. Bibby, then your staff would not have over-served in the first place.

Let me remind you that within the pages of the Liquor-Primary Licence Guide (BC Liquor laws) it clearly states: “You must encourage moderate consumption at all times and follow strict limits on the maximum size of servings…it is your responsibility to make sure patrons do not become intoxicated while in your establishment…see that he or she departs safely.”

Furthermore, the Serving It Right course (cash cow) which is mandatory for servers of liquor, clearly teaches students how not to over-serve. “Serving It Right…educates…servers about their legal responsibilities when serving liquor…”

It seems to me that your “great staff” perhaps went beyond their call of duty when serving Susan that evening. After all, your firm belief is that Susan was over-served.

Having said this, and your believing that Susan was over-served, did any one of your “great staff” or the restaurant manager, or yourself, for that matter, inquire as to whether Susan was planning on driving herself home or if she had called a cab? Did your hotel in fact permit a patron to leave intoxicated without knowing her travel arrangements? Does your hotel have a ‘drive home’ program and if so, did you offer that to the “over-served” Susan?

Perhaps Susan would like to consider suing you and/or the hotel for over-service which then caused her to behave “over-gregariously”?

Perhaps you ought to acquaint yourself better with the B.C. liquor laws and read the guide thoroughly. And shame on you for allowing “over-service” to result in (patrons) becoming “over-social.”

Gregarious, indeed.

 

 

Linda MacGillivray,

Kelowna

,’’ and that it had nothing to do with her kissing her girlfriend.

Daniel Bibby, the Delta Grand Hotel general manager, claims that by his estimates, “Hillock was drunk” and then in the same breath states that the hotel was “being compliant with B.C. liquor laws,” and that he has “a great team of service staff who are well trained, and refuse additional drinks to people they believe are intoxicated.”

If you have the great staff you claim you do, Mr. Bibby, then your staff would not have over-served in the first place.

Let me remind you that within the pages of the Liquor-Primary Licence Guide (BC Liquor laws) it clearly states: “You must encourage moderate consumption at all times and follow strict limits on the maximum size of servings…it is your responsibility to make sure patrons do not become intoxicated while in your establishment…see that he or she departs safely.”

Furthermore, the Serving It Right course (cash cow) which is mandatory for servers of liquor, clearly teaches students how not to over-serve. “Serving It Right…educates…servers about their legal responsibilities when serving liquor…”

It seems to me that your “great staff” perhaps went beyond their call of duty when serving Susan that evening. After all, your firm belief is that Susan was over-served.

Having said this, and your believing that Susan was over-served, did any one of your “great staff” or the restaurant manager, or yourself, for that matter, inquire as to whether Susan was planning on driving herself home or if she had called a cab? Did your hotel in fact permit a patron to leave intoxicated without knowing her travel arrangements? Does your hotel have a ‘drive home’ program and if so, did you offer that to the “over-served” Susan?

Perhaps Susan would like to consider suing you and/or the hotel for over-service which then caused her to behave “over-gregariously”?

Perhaps you ought to acquaint yourself better with the B.C. liquor laws and read the guide thoroughly. And shame on you for allowing “over-service” to result in (patrons) becoming “over-social.”

Gregarious, indeed.

 

 

Linda MacGillivray,

Kelowna

 

Kelowna Capital News

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