RCMP veterans like new detachment

Former 100 Mile House RCMP officers reflect on old detachment office

Constables Bob Sissons, left front, Norm Fuchs and Len Jerritt; and Ted Brecknell, left back, and Scott Ramsay stand in front of 100 Mile House RCMP Detachment on Aspen Avenue.

Constables Bob Sissons, left front, Norm Fuchs and Len Jerritt; and Ted Brecknell, left back, and Scott Ramsay stand in front of 100 Mile House RCMP Detachment on Aspen Avenue.

The 100 Mile House RCMP detachment has moved into its new building, but the old one still holds memories.

There are a few retired members who still live in the area and had worked out of the old detachment.

Martin Sarich – retired

“All the credit to Staff/Sgt. Blake Ward and Sgt. Don McLean for ensuring the new design, equipment and technological advances were installed in the new building, says 34-year RCMP veteran and former commanding officer Martin Sarich.”

“It’s an impressive building and has state-of-the-art equipment.”

Sarich last seven years in the RCMP was spent in the 100 Mile House detachment at the Alpine Avenue location.

“In addition to the 18 regular members during my time as detachment commander, there were six support staff and a victim assistance co-ordinator, plus guards and matrons.

“Then we had computer work stations and other system terminals; plus file-and-exhibit storage took up considerable space, and while we didn’t all work at one time, it was crammed.”

Scotty Ramsay – retired

“It was a different world. There were five constables at the time and we all worked 12- to 14-hour days,” says former RCMP Constable Scotty Ramsay.

“Everybody out there had a gun in their vehicle, but it was for hunting animals.”

Ramsay came to 100 Mile House in 1961 and worked out of the old building on Aspen Avenue.

The building had one office they shared with a judge, two cells, main entrance, and living quarters.

“The back of the building had sleeping quarters for us three single guys, and the high part of the detachment housed the married one.”

Back in those days RCMP members could not get married until they had five years in the force.

“The new building is nice. It’s quiet, though, not like the old days with the clacking of typewriters.

“I think the one thing that has changed the most is communications.

“There were no computers, cell phones, tablets, pagers, portable radios, e-mails, Internet, etc. We had to go through the local B.C. Tel operator via crank phones.

“Every report was typed and Canada Post was the end all.”

100 Mile House Free Press

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