The 75-hectare Trout Creek Ecological Reserve is one of 14 such reserves in the Okanagan Valley.

The 75-hectare Trout Creek Ecological Reserve is one of 14 such reserves in the Okanagan Valley.

Ecological reserves discussed

Invading ladybugs, a Barney-purple coloured lake and reptiles are some of the features of the South Okanagan’s ecological reserves.

Invading ladybugs, a Barney-purple coloured lake and an array of reptiles are some of the unusual features of the South Okanagan’s ecological reserves. Local reserve wardens Eva Durance, Laurie Rockwell and Don Guild will reveal more secrets about these reserves in a presentation sponsored by the Okanagan Similkameen Parks Society on Friday, April 13, in the Centre Stage Theatre in Summerland.

Ecological reserves are special areas throughout B.C. set aside to preserve ecosystems, plant and animal species, features and phenomena and for scientific research and educational purposes.

Keith Baric, Okanagan region planning section head with the Ministry of Environment, will give an overview of the 14 ecological reserves in the Okanagan, four of which are in the South Okanagan: Mahoney Lake, Trout Creek, Haynes and Big White Mountain.

The presentation follows the society’s 47th annual meeting at 7 p.m.

Admission is free and donations are welcome.

The Okanagan Similkameen Parks Society has a decades-long interest in protecting natural areas. Established in 1966, it was instrumental in securing provincial park status for Cathedral Mountain, Conkle Lake and Okanagan Mountain. In addition, the society purchased 700 acres (283 hectares) of winter rangeland for what is now known as the Vaseux-Bighorn National Wildlife Area and recommended to the Ecological Reserves Committee that a 200-acre reserve (81 hectares) be placed on arid and marsh lands at the head of Osoyoos Lake.

For more information call 250-494-8996 or visit okanagansimilkameenparkssociety.ca.

 

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