Kristin Butcher

Kristin Butcher

What jobs did your ancestors have?

A few years ago I wrote a book called Pharaohs and Foot…

Kristin Butcher
Genealogy - Kristin Butcher

Many pitfalls can catch you up in your research

In elementary school, I remember the teacher lining the students up around…

Genealogy - Kristin Butcher
Kristin Butcher

Family secrets – a genealogist’s conundrum

To tell or not to tell—that is the question genealogists must ask…

Kristin Butcher
Kristin Butcher

Looking a gift horse in the mouth

Most families have many heirlooms, and there is a reason they have been kept and passed along.

Kristin Butcher

Still looking for answers surrounding great-great grandfather

In chart form, a family tree contains the briefest of information. It…

A photo sent to my grandmother from my uncle, during World War II. Fortunately, he wrote on the back, but if he hadn’t, I could have compared his likeness to others I have of him, narrowed the time frame through his uniform and the attire of the other man, and used my knowledge of the family to pinpoint the time, place, and people.

Identifying people in old photographs

GENEOLOGY WITH KRISTIN BUTCHER

A photo sent to my grandmother from my uncle, during World War II. Fortunately, he wrote on the back, but if he hadn’t, I could have compared his likeness to others I have of him, narrowed the time frame through his uniform and the attire of the other man, and used my knowledge of the family to pinpoint the time, place, and people.
Kristin Butcher
Kristin Butcher
Kristin Butcher
Kristin Butcher
Kristin Butcher
Kristin Butcher
Leaving a legacy online

Leaving a legacy online

Geneology with Kristin Butcher

Leaving a legacy online
Don’t get discouraged – our family is out there

Don’t get discouraged – our family is out there

Tracing one’s ancestry today is much easier and faster than it used…

Don’t get discouraged – our family is out there
Intendant Jean Talon launched the first census in Canada – in New France in 1666.
Intendant Jean Talon launched the first census in Canada – in New France in 1666.
Kristin Butcher

Well-intended home children program brought many to Canada

My grandfather, William Philip Martin, was a home child

Kristin Butcher
To illustrate how family structures can change, consider Elizabeth Graham Hood (my husband’s relative on his mother’s side). She was born in 1831 in Glasgow Scotland. The following year, her mother and father—a doctor, died in an epidemic. Just one year old, Elizabeth and four of her siblings were put on a ship and sent to Simcoe, Ontario to be raised by their aunt. Elizabeth and her sister each married one of their cousins.

What if your family tree has a limb that doesn’t seem to be attached?

Finding an adopted person’s roots is no easy task

To illustrate how family structures can change, consider Elizabeth Graham Hood (my husband’s relative on his mother’s side). She was born in 1831 in Glasgow Scotland. The following year, her mother and father—a doctor, died in an epidemic. Just one year old, Elizabeth and four of her siblings were put on a ship and sent to Simcoe, Ontario to be raised by their aunt. Elizabeth and her sister each married one of their cousins.
Long time Campbell River resident Bob Jamieson learned the fishing business at a young age, and at 17, was already skipper of this gill net collector, picking up fish in Loughborough Inlet.

Bob Jamieson is a treasure trove of area history

Local collector of obituaries is donating albums of them to Genealogy Society

Long time Campbell River resident Bob Jamieson learned the fishing business at a young age, and at 17, was already skipper of this gill net collector, picking up fish in Loughborough Inlet.
Quest breaking through dead ends

Quest breaking through dead ends

Get into genealogy at next week's event

Quest breaking through dead ends
This look at daily life in the ERT camps was inspired by this sculpture, purchased recently at a second-hand shop in Willow Point by a genealogy friend for the lofty price of $1. According to the stamp on the back of one of the forks, the cutlery came from Camp 8.

Forest industry made Campbell River

GENEALOGY: Without the logging industry, Campbell River may not have grown into the city it is today

This look at daily life in the ERT camps was inspired by this sculpture, purchased recently at a second-hand shop in Willow Point by a genealogy friend for the lofty price of $1. According to the stamp on the back of one of the forks, the cutlery came from Camp 8.

Nothing beats a graveyard stroll

GENEALOGY: Rediscovering those misplaced stories and reworking them into the tapestry of our community

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